America needs to know what Mueller knows about Trump. Here's how that could happen (legally).

by Jill Wine-Banks and Gerald Goldman

Whether Trump is guilty or innocent, the public and its elected officials deserve to know the truth.

 FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Alex Wong / Getty Images file

FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Alex Wong / Getty Images file

During Watergate, as assistant Watergate special prosecutors, we thought a lot about why the public and Congress needed to know what we knew about President Richard Nixon. We found ways to reveal the facts back then that special counsel Robert Mueller can use now along with some additional ones available to him under new rules.

Whether President Donald Trump is guilty or innocent of conspiring to violate U.S. law, obstructing justice, or covering up something else entirely, the public and its elected officials deserve to know the truth. If he is guilty of criminal activity, there is the possibility he could misuse his executive powers with very grave consequences. Indeed, this was a concern we had as Nixon's political support crumpled. If Trump feels trapped as Nixon did, who knows what he could do?

Without facts, Congress cannot make informed decisions about Trump’s fitness for office and voters cannot make informed decisions at the ballot box.